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The 40th Year

   GRAND CANYON COLLOQUIUM –4120-01 

        for information click on COLQ 4120-01

                               Spring Semester -- 2014

Courses in Anthropology

1010 Human Origins (3)

Course Description: Biological evolution of the human species and the archaeology of early peoples. Relationship of humans to other primates, living and extinct. Cultural achievements of early Homo sapiens and their relationship to biological evolution and the natural environment. The fossil and archaeological record of Pliocene and Pleistocene humans.

Course Goal: The goal of this course is to give the student a broad understanding of human biocultural evolution.

Course Objectives: The objectives of this course are to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of physical (biological) anthropology and principles of organic evolution, in relation to the biology, ecology, and behavior of primates and fossil and living humans. We also will come to recognize the dynamic interplay between archaeology and physical anthropology in the continuing refinement of our understanding of human origins.

Measurable Outcomes: By the end of the semester, the student will be proficient (as determined via written examination) in current evolutionary theory, paleoanthropology (from both phylogenetic and prehistoric lifeway reconstruction perspectives), and paleolithic archaeology.

Sample 1010 Syllabus - Sample 101 Syllabus

1020 Cultural Anthropology (3)

Course Description: The observed range of variation of ways of life around the world. The cross-cultural investigation of becoming and being human. Comparative treatment of social organization, subsistence activities, values, and religion.

Course Goal: Provide basic understanding of the sub-field of cultural anthropology including the culture concept, cultural relativism, and ethnographic research. Identify major findings of cultural anthropology. Understand how cultural beliefs and social structures vary from place to place and over time through studying the ethnographic findings of societies in all hemispheres - north, south, east, and west.

Course Objectives: Supply overview of the fundamental characteristics of culture and uses of ethnographic research. Define concepts and terminology related to the study of kinship and descent, patterns of subsistence, political organization and social control, and spirituality. Provide comparative treatment of social organization, economic systems, and processes of cultural change with a focus on non-Western societies.

Student Outcomes: Students who successfully complete this course and its requirements will leave this course with the ability to do the following: Identify the defining characteristics of culture and principal methods of ethnographic research. Compare and contrast how people organize themselves in terms of family relations, political organization and social control, economic systems, and spirituality as described by ethnographic case-studies. Describe different mechanisms of change and variations in local responses to change.

Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

1030 Languages of the World (3)

Course Description: This course aims to equip students with some basic facts about the world's languages, a fundamental prerequisite to understanding the nature of human language. We will be examining: (1) the diversity of languages across space and time, and (2) the fundamental similarities of languages. We will address a range of questions about language through an exploration of the following areas: language families and historical relationships, linguistic typology, language universals, sound and structure features of the world's languages, and writing systems.

Course Goal: Explain how linguists study linguistic diversity and the unity that underlies that diversity in the languages of the world. Help students to understand the equality of all human languages despite the diversity of world language and culture.

Course Objectives: Equip students with basic linguistic concepts and vocabulary for understanding human language and typology. Explore world languages' linguistic unity and diversity, focusing on sound and sound patterns, word structures, sentences, meaning and culturally-driven taboos. Examine natural language contact phenomena: genetic and areal relationships, language birth, language change, and language death.

Student Outcomes: Students should be able to identify world language families using linguistic vocabulary to illustrate the unique features attested in each language family. Students should be able to define and give examples of language relationships involving genetics and areal or regional affiliation. Students should be able to identify and demonstrate their understanding of natural language contact phenomena. For example, they should be able to identify living languages, endangered languages, mixed languages, and so on.

Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

1140 Freshman Seminar (3)

Varies; specific description available when offered.

1190 Freshman Writing Seminar (4)

Varies; title and specific description available when offered. Open to freshmen only. Fulfills English proficiency requirement.

2010 World Prehistory (3)

This course offers a synthetic review of the archaeological prehistory and biological evolution of our species. The course examines topics in paleoanthropology ranging from the ancestors of australopithecines in the Miocene to the emergence of complex hunter-gatherer societies at the end of Pleistocene. The course seeks to integrate both archaeological and biological anthropological evidence in understanding the emergence of modern human anatomy and behavior.  Fulfills Category C of curricular requirement

2020 Visual Languages Across Cultures (3)

2030 The Anthropology of Women and Men (3)

A cross-cultural survey of women in society and culture among hunters and gatherers, pastoral nomads and agriculturalists of Oceania, the Near East, Africa, and the New World . Kinship and female symbolism in Africa , women and men in myths in traditional societies. Cross-cultural variability of women's roles and status and the variability of women's and men's language and behavior. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

2100 Myth and Life (3)

Traditional oral narratives in their social and cultural context. The functions of myth in developing individual character and supporting social values. The structure of myth. Causes and limits of change. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

2880 Writing Practicum (1)

Varies; section number and explanation available when offered. Fulfills writing requirement

3010 Hunters and Gatherers (3)

Comparative study of selected modern and past groups of hunter-gatherers. Anthropological approaches to understanding subsistence practices, social organization, and cultural change in non-agricultural societies. Both ethnographic and archaeological cases will be considered. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3060 South American Indians (3)

Ethnology of the indigenous peoples of lowland South America and adjacent southern Central America . The course examines cultural developments from prehistory to the present. Models for the classification of indigenous cultures, societies, and languages are critically reviewed. See ANTH 606. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3070 Contemporary Chinese Society (3)

The course focuses primarily on contemporary Chinese society as it exists in the People's Republic of China and provides some historical background from Imperial China. Special attention is given to exploring Chinese attitudes toward life goals and social mobility, gender formation and social behavior, law and dispute management strategies, and religious beliefs and the cult of the dead. See ANTH 607. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3080 East Asia (3)

Anthropological examination of East Asia, focusing on China , Japan , and Korea . Topics include mainstream philosophical traditions, individual and society, ethnicity and nationalism, gender and globalization. See ANTH 608. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3090 Selected Cultural Systems (3)

Varies; title and description available when offered.

For Spring 2012:   ANTH 3090-01 is Bioarchaeology of Mummies

                           ANTH 3091-01 is Urban Latin America

                           ANTH 3092-01 is Anthropology of Space

                           ANTH 3093-01 is Lexicography

                           Lexicography is the art, science and practice of making dictionaries.  

                           This course will explore the role of lexicographers and the uses of

                           dictionaries in society.  Topics will include (a) orthographic conventions, (b)

                           guides to pronunciation, (c) inflection potentials, (d) word class assignments,

                           (e) syntactic elaborations, (f) idiomatic usages, (g) monolingual, bilingual,

                           and polyglot constructions, (h) regional and social ascription, (i) etymology,

                           (j) e-dictionaries, open and closed, (k) dictionaries as tools for cultural

                           description, conservation and revitalization.  We will work with Tunica

                           materials as part of the Tunica revitalization project, but students may

                           choose to work on other languages and material development.   Textbooks: 

                           Bo Svensén: A handbook of lexicography: the theory and practice of

                           dictionary-making. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge   Piet van

                           Sterkenburg, ed. A practical Guide to Lexicography:  Terminology and

                           Lexicography Research and Practice.  John Benjamins: Amsterdam

                          

                           ANTH3094-01 is Languages in Louisiana

                           ANTH 3095-01 is Maya Epigraphy & Archaeology

                           ANTH 3096-01 is Ethnography Performance & Identity NOLA                           

For Fall 2011:       ANTH 3090-01 is Citizen and Culture

                          ANTH 3091-02 is Native American Languages

                          ANTH 3092-01 is Culture & Power in African Diaspora

                          ANTH 3093-01 is Urban Anthropology

                          ANTH 3095-02 is Religion, Witchcraft & Religion

                          ANTH 3096-01 is Interview as Cultural Conversation

                          ANTH 3097-01 is Latin American Anthropology Topics

For Spring 2011:  ANTH 3090-01 is Bioarchaeology of Mummies

                          ANTH 3091-01 is Rock Art Research

                          ANTH 3092-01 is Archaeology of Colonialism

                          ANTH 3093-01 is The Human Skeleton

                          ANTH 3094-01 is Languages of Louisiana

For Fall 2010:       ANTH 3091-01 is State in Mexico and Central America

                          ANTH 3093-01 is Advanced Topics in Maya Archaeology

                          ANTH 3094-01 is Magic and Witchcraft

                          ANTH 3095-01 is Biological Anthropology

                          ANTH 3096-01 is Public Folklore and Culture

For Spring 2010:  ANTH 3090-01 is Semantics

                          ANTH 3091-01 is Louisiana Speech

                          ANTH 3092-01 is Methods and Theory in Primatology

                          ANTH 3093-01 is Magic and Witchcraft

                          ANTH 3094-01 is The Human Skeleton

                          ANTH 3095-01 is Biological Anthropology

                        

For Fall 2009:      ANTH 309-03 is Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

                          ANTH 309-04 is Introduction to Sociolinguistics

For Spring 2009:  ANTH 309-03 is Introduction to Bioanthropology

                          ANTH 309-04 is Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

For Fall 2008:      ANTH 309-02 is The Four-Field Concept. Philosophical underpinnings of

                          general anthropology. Epistemological ramifications of four anthropological    

                          fields (subdisciplines) as complete coverage of the subject matter.

                          Contingency vs. rationale in the amalgamation of the four fields, as

                          distinctive and definitive of the holistic study of Homo sapiens. Initial   

                          development of the model in the British Isles; institutionalization in 20th 

                          century North America. Connections to study of natives of the New World and

                          salvage ethnography.  Growth and specialization in subdisciplines. Debates

                          over the logic and practicality in continuing cohesion of the model.

                          ANTH 309-04 is Introduction to Biological Anthropology. Biological 

                          anthropology is the study of human biological evolution and variation. This

                          course begins with background information on evolution. We then deal with

                          the relationship of humans to the rest of the natural world, focusing on the

                          biology and behavior of apes and humans. The fossil record of human origins

                          and evolution is covered next, focusing on major events and current debates

                          in the field. This will be an introductory class but it is not a survey of physical

                          anthropology; instead we will study certain aspects of the field in depth.

                         ANTH 309-05 is Archaeology of Social Organization. Current literature on

                         the social organization of ancient societies represents a diverse range of

                         interpretations which primarily utilize antiquated terms.  In this class, we will

                         critically examine archaeological arguments on social organization and look to

                          both the historical foundation of these ideas as well as new concepts of how

                         social organization is reflected in the archaeological record.  Students will be

                          exposed to literature from socio-cultural anthropology and archaeology to

                         better understand the fundamentals of this issue.  Students will also begin to

                         build a model of archaeological correlates by defining broad scale patterning                            in the ethnographic and archaeological records.

 

For Spring 2008: ANTH 309-01 is Anthropology of Money.

                         ANTH 309-02 is Archaeology of Art.

                         ANTH 309-03 is Archaeology of Culture, Contact.

                         ANTH 309-04 is Language Death.

                         ANTH 309-05 is Diaspora Yoruba.

                         ANTH 309-06 is Comm in Archaeology, Ethnohistory.

For Fall 2007:     ANTH 309-02 is Many Faces of Islam.

                         ANTH 309-03 is Anthropology of Cities.

                         ANTH 309-04 is Contemporary Vietnamese Society.

                         ANTH 309-05 is History of Human Technology.

                         ANTH 309-06 is Family and Gender in East Asia.

                         ANTH 309-07 is Pol Econ: Ancient Colo LA.

For Spring 2007: ANTH 309-01 is Religion and Modernities.

                         ANTH 309-02 is African Modenities.

For Fall 2006:     ANTH 309-01 is Religion and Identiry.

                         ANTH 309-02 is Contemporary Issues in SE Asia.

                         ANTH 309-04 is LA PreColumbian Cultures.

For Spring 2006:  ANTH 309-01 is Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction.

                         ANTH 309-02 is Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction.

                         ANTH 309-03 is Archaeology of Gender.

                         ANTH 309-04 is Primate Models Human Evolution.

                         ANTH 309-05 is Ethnic Society Movement in Latin America.

                         ANTH 309-06 is Urban Anthropology.

                         ANTH 309-07 is Seminar in Historical Ecology.

3110 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)

A survey of the cultures of sub-Saharan Africa from the time of European contact to the present. A detailed study of selected African cultures, identifying, and explaining cultural diversity and unity of African cultures, and comparing African cultures with cultures of other geographic areas. Inequality, development, the family, gender roles, kinship systems, and world view are considered. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3120 Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction (3)

Throughout this course we will examine current issues in human sexual behavior and reproduction (both biological and cultural) from an anthropological perspective. Most broadly defined, Anthropology is the study of human kind and through anthropological investigations we strive to learn who we are, how we came to be, and where we are headed. This approach will enable us to study the interrelatedness of biological, behavioral, cultural, social, and political aspects of human sex and reproduction. Through readings, lectures, films and class discussions we will examine issues such as new reproductive technologies, the biology and culture of pregnancy and childbirth, homosexuality, menopause, etc.

3140 Primate Behavior and Ecology (3)

An introduction to the social and physical diversity of the Order Primates, emphasizing the biology, ecology, and behavior of living nonhuman primates. Social structure will be explored from an evolutionary perspective, and the ecological and social constraints on behavioral flexibility will be examined. Examples will cover both field and laboratory investigations of nonhuman primates. Student may not take both ANTH 314 and ANTH 614 for credit.

3150 Cognitive Anthropology (3)

Cross-cultural investigation of human thinking and rationality. Assesses linguistic relativity; cognitive rationalism; comparative aspects of human classification and nomenclature of diverse semantic fields; the use of linguistic and cultural universals in attempts to define the nature of human thought processes; possible relationships among sociocultural evolution and the size and structure of given vocabularies in unrelated languages; and the problem of irrationality. See ANTH 615. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3160 Peoples of the Pacific (3)

Introduction to the cultures of Polynesia , Micronesia , Melanesia, and Australia from the first settlement to the emergence of modern nation-states. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3180 Ethnic China (3)

3190 Economic Anthropology (3)

The study of economic behavior in band, tribal, and peasant societies. Emphasis on the impact of culture and environment on economic decision-making in the Third World . Competing theoretical approaches, particularly evolutionary, ecological, substantivist and Marxist are critically reviewed. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3200 Magic, Witchcraft & Religion (3)

 

3220 Ethnology of Insular SE Asia (3)

3260 Highland Mexican Prehistory (3)

Patterns and processes of cultural developments in the highlands of central Mexico , western Mexico , and Oaxaca as known from archaeological and ethnohistorical data. Early cultures, Toltecs, Aztecs, Mixtecs, Zapotecs. See ANTH 626. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3280 Middle American Indians (3)

This course covers the indigenous cultures of Mexico and Guatemala from just before the Spanish conquest down to the present. Major topics include the mighty Aztec civilization, the consequences of the Spanish conquest and colonial rule, the endurance of distinctive indigenous cultures into modern times, the impact of development programs and globalization, and current indigenous movements in the region. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3290 The Nature of Language (3)

Language as a reflection of the human mind and the role of language in defining the essence of humanity. Language and the expression of social values. Emphasis on analysis of primary linguistic data. Critical examination of theories of linguistic structure.

3300 History of Writing (3)

This course will look at the different systems of writing which have been used in various cultures through time with attention to the materials and purpose in relation to the cultures. Orientation to and practice in decipherment will be included. Finally, the issues of modern script development will be introduced. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3310 Historical Linguistics (3)

The investigation of language change and its causes. The reconstruction of earlier linguistic forms. The Indo-European language family. Selected problems in phonological and grammatical reconstruction.

3320 Archaeology of Gender (3)

The study of gender roles, gender relations, and gender ideologies in past societies.

3330 Anthropology of Gender (3)

A theoretical and ethnographical examination of how gender is constructed across cultures. Topics include sex and gender, gender identity, bodily experiences, masculinity and femininity, gender roles, kinship and gender, gender stratification, and gender equality, as well as gender, ethnicity, and class.

3340 Introduction to Archaeology (3)

Introduction to the method, theory, and techniques of prehistoric archaeology. Relationship of archaeology to other disciplines, how and why archaeologists work, archaeological records, dating, analysis and interpretation of artifacts, sites, and environments. Consideration of selected case studies.

3350 Culture and Religion (3)

Religions, ideas, ritual, and organization of primitive peoples; nativistic and messianic movements; function of religion in social systems. See ANTH 635. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3360 Anthropology of Cities (3)

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. Topics include the cultural meanings of public space and the built environment, processes of social differentiation and class formation, the role of capital, and the emergence of social movements. The second half of the course is organized around a comparison of four ethnographic case-studies of cities outside the United States and Europe. Throughout the semester, studies will also discuss how anthropological approaches may be applied to New Orleans.

3370 Locating Southeast Asia (3)

This course examines contemporary Southeast Asia.  As one of the most diverse regions in the world, the region confounds easy characterization. The first part of the course provides students with a broad overview of the social, cultural, and political institutions of the region with a focus on Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam.  The second part turns to contemporary issues including political and economic development, religious change, and cultural constructions of identity.  Readings include academic essays, short stories, and full-length ethnographies.

3380 Cultural Dynamics (3)

An exploration of the development in the western tradition of ideas concerning culture, its variation, and change. The courses focuses on the specific insights of anthropology with regard to the study of change processes such as innovation, directed culture change, nativism, and revitalization. The relevant contributions of other social sciences will also be considered.

3390 Peasants in Preindustrial Society (3)

An examination of the concept of peasants as a distinct socio-cultural type and the predominant segment of preindustrial civilizations around the world, down to the 20th century. Agricultural systems, population dynamics, ideologies and systems of stratification, and strategies of resistance are among major topics addressed. Consideration is also given to early modern transformations and the problems associated with modernization. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3395 Ethnography of Performance & Identity in N.O. and French LA (3)

3400 Language and Culture (3)

Language, the complex symbolic system of our species, has the power to index, refer to, frame and reframe social reality. Cultures, shared symbolic and interactional systems, both shape and are shaped by language and its use. This course will explore speech communities around the world, their social practices and the language schemata which ground them: the quotidian instance of "asking for a drink" in Indonesia , the ritual of trading insults in inner city Detroit , the routine of formal and phatic greetings among the Kuna.

3430 Archaeology of Cultural Landscapes (3)

Landscapes are an outcome of natural processes and cultural activity. Like archaeological sites, landscapes are palimpsests of the many forces of change that create them. Archaeologists of course do study ancient monuments and settlements, but they are also interested in the relationships between sites, patterns of movement between and through them, and the ways that past societies understood the landscapes in which they lived. This course explores the archaeology of landscapes, the effects of humans on ancient environments, and the social, and even sacred meanings of architecture, monuments and places in the past. Cross-listed as EVST (Environmental Studies) 343/643.

3440 Dialectology (3)

Introduction to language variation both geographically and socially. The course looks at the history and methods of dialectology as well as the ways speakers demonstrate identity through speech patterns.

3441 Lexicography (3)

 

Lexicography is the art, science and practice of making dictionaries.  This course will explore the role of lexicographers and the uses of dictionaries in society.  Topics will include (a) orthographic conventions, (b) guides to pronunciation, (c) inflection potentials, (d) word class assignments, (e) syntactic elaborations, (f) idiomatic usages, (g) monolingual, bilingual,        and polyglot constructions, (h) regional and social ascription, (i) etymology, (j) e-dictionaries, open and closed, (k) dictionaries as tools for cultural description, conservation and revitalization.  We will work with Tunica materials as part of the Tunica revitalization project, but students may choose to work on other languages and material development.  

3450 Methods of Observation in Behavioral Research (3)

This course will focus on the development, design, analysis, and presentation of research on behavior using observational methods. While these methods can be used on captive populations (zoo, research center), they are appropriate also for studies of free-ranging animals, including human beings. The student will be exposed to the specific challenges of observational research and will learn appropriate levels of analysis.

3460 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)

3470 Many Faces of Islam (3)

3480 African Modernities (3)

This course explores the concept of modernity in Africa. People often use the term “modern” to designate what they imagine to be a process of social evolution correlated with a set of technologies and economic forms, all of which are seen as incompatible with Africa. By questioning the coherence of both Africa and modernity as discrete entities, students look at how “Africa” emerged as a product of colonialism and at how the concept of modernity grew out of a set of colonial projects that contrasted African “primitivism” with the “modern” metropole. Europeans defined the “Africa” produced by colonialism as the antithesis of the modern. Through colonization Europeans would bring education, technology, and new forms of government to Africa and catapult Africans into a new level of social evolution. Contemporary Africa grows out of this strange conjuncture, and the purpose of this course is to trace the spectrum of African modernities from their roots in colonial modernism. Students will consider cultural developments such as romantic love, music, and consumption as well as new forms of religiosity and development in established religions, economic change, state corruption, and violence.

3510 Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism (3)

Theoretical and ethnographic examinations of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Topics also include multiculturalism, globalization, and diasporas. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3520 Diaspora Yoruba (3)

3530 Arts of Native North America (3)

A survey of the great range of media and the many forms of aesthetic expression developed by the indigenous peoples of what today are the United States and Canada . The course examines the functions of art in smaller-scale societies and illustrates aspects of their dynamics. Changes in arts due to European contact, attempts at revivals of specific genres, and the emergence of named artists in the 20th century are also addressed. See ANTH 653. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

3535 Native American Language & Linguistics (3)

3540 Plains Indians (3)

Popularly considered the very image of Native America, 19th century Plains cultures were a recent and tragically short-lived florescence. The course examines indigenous life on the Plains before the arrival of horses, the migrations of peoples with diverse origins on to the Plains, and the transformation of their life-ways through the introduction of horses and European trade goods.

See ANTH 654. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement 

3560 Environmental Archaeology (3)

This course examines the fundamentally important relationship between human behavior and environmental change in the past.  It looks at both the ways in which humans have responded to their environmental circumstances and the ways in which human activities have influenced environmental conditions at various scales.  The course explores methods for learning about environmental conditions in the past and the nature of human interaction with the environment.  The course also presents basic information on some particularly important topics concerning past human/environment interactions, including (1) causes of global climate change, (2) human roles in Pleistocene megafauna, (3) post-Pleistocene adaptation, (4) the origins of agriculture and animal domestication, (5)  agricultural landscape modification and environmental over-exploitation, and (6) Holocene changes in human health, including the origins of modern disease epidemics.

3590 Introduction to Syntax (3)

Introduction of transformational generative syntax, with examples from selected areas of English grammar. Formal models in grammatical description. Emphasis on the logic of linguistic argumentation.

3630 Linguistic Phonetics (3)

An overview of articulatory and acoustic phonetics with emphasis on matching acoustic clues closely with the articulatory gestures. The first part of the course will study the articulatory and acoustic cues to the range of English and non-English speech sounds with information about the normal range of variation. The second part will focus on collecting and interpreting acoustic data and on using such data as evidence to solve phonological problems in normal and pathological speech.

3640 Phonology (3)

Introduction to phonological analysis and theory, with strong emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages. Major issues to be addressed include universal principles of human phonological systems, language-specific variation, constraints on representation of rules, the relationship of phonology to morphological and syntactic components of the grammar, and the historical underpinnings of current theoretical models.

3650 Morphology (3)

Introduction to prosodic and non-prosodic morphology with emphasis on data analysis and argumentation. With data from a variety of languages, the first part of the course will examine non-prosodic morphological processes to highlight the typology of word structure across languages. The second part will examine morphological processes conditioned by prosody and consider the various frameworks for analyzing the data; eventually the course will work toward a formal model. The main objectives of the course are: 1) to learn to analyze morphological data; 2) to learn to compare alternative analyses for a given set of data and to find evidence to choose between the alternatives; and 3) to learn to present linguistic analysis and argumentation in a coherent essay.

 

3660 Discourse Analysis: Pragmatics of Language Use (3)

Study of written and spoken texts from a variety of languages and language-use contexts. Focus on structural aspects of language (noun phrase construction and anaphora, topicalization, focus constructions, word order, deictics and definite reference) as they relate to the situated use of language.

3670 Language and Its Acquisition (3)

Introduction to issues such as language and its relation to animal communication, the genetic basis of language ability and acquisition, neurological aspects of linguistic knowledge, and first language acquisition. Emphasis on data collection, description, and analysis.

3680 Language and Power (3)

Exploration of the ways that language indexes, reflects, and constructs power. Cross-cultural study of the interrelationship of social ascriptions, attitudes toward groups and their members, and the speech patterns of in-group/out-group members. Examination of the manipulation of power and its linguistic correlates in the domains of medicine, the media, education, and the law. Effects of language policy, especially officialization and standardization, on speakers of minority languages or codes.

3690 Language and Gender (3)

Exploration of the structures of language--phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic--as they index, interrelate with, and construct gender identities cross-culturally.

3700 Environmental Anthropology (3)

Critically reviews case studies of ecosystemic and energetic relations between human populations, cultures, and the environment in diverse ethnographic settings of the world, such as Amazonia, the Great Basin, New Guinea and Southeast Asia . Examines the historical emergence of ecological paradigms in anthropology. Compares the modern contributions of cultural ecology, evolutionary ecology, ethnoecology, and historical ecology. Evaluates potential contributions of ecological anthropology to general ecology.

3710 Historical Ecology of Amazonia (3)

Interactions between local peoples and Amazonian landscapes from prehistory to the present. Amazonian landscapes as an analytic unit will be examined from the interdisciplinary perspective of historical ecology. Changes and development of forests and savannas since the arrival of human beings. Historical, ecological, cultural forces involved in biological and edaphic diversity in modern forests. Long-term effects of prehistoric and historic human occupations and manipulation of landscapes. Implications for conservation and development. See EEOB 371/671 and ANTH 671. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

3720 Adaptation and Human Variability (3)

Biological adaptations of living human populations to their environments, and the interaction of these adaptations with cultural patterns. Relationships of body size, form, and composition to climatic and nutritional factors in various geographical groups of modern man. Major adaptive problems facing the human species are discussed and implications for the future explored.

3730 Principles of Forensic Anthropology (3)

Introduction to forensic anthropology, a subdiscipline of physical anthropology concerned with the identification of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Surveys the history of the field and the techniques used to determine age, sex, and physical characteristics of an individual from skeletonized remains, as well as methods used for positive identification, estimating time since death, and determining cause and manner of death.

3740 Human Sociobiology (3)

Investigation of human social behavior from an evolutionary perspective, including the interplay among culture, environment, and natural selection. A critical analysis of studies done utilizing evolutionary interpretations of human social behavior will be the topic of discussion, including recommendations on improvements of this line of investigation.

3745 Bioarchaeology of Mummies (3)

3750 Bones, Bodies, and Disease (3)

Survey of the field of paleopathology, the study of health and disease in ancient populations. Topics include: methods for identifying evidence of injury and disease in bones, teeth, and mummified tissue; ancient medicine and surgery; chemical approaches to reconstructing diet; and human health trends through time.

3755 Human Osteology (3)

The objective of this course is to learn the anatomy of the human skeleton and dentition and the techniques physical anthropologists use to excavate, identify, and analyze human skeletal remains.  You will learn how to identify the various bones of the skeleton, how to distinguish human from non-human bone, how to determine sex and estimate age at death; and how to measure bones in order to reconstruct living stature and physical characteristics from skeletal remains.  Examples from archaeological excavations and forensic cases will be used to illustrate the kinds of information human skeletons can provide about ancient and modern populations.  Practical and written exams and laboratory exercises hone your skills at recognizing anatomical landmarks, identifying fragmentary osteological material, measuring bones, and conducting a detailed skeletal inventory. 

3760 Primate Evolution and Adaptation (3)

This course will focus on the anatomy, evolution and adaptive radiation of the Order Primates. Basic information on living primates and detailed investigation of the primate fossil record will be presented. The dynamic nature of the field will be the subject of class discussion and investigative essays.

3770 Global Vietnam (3)

This course examines how Vietnamese-American identities are constructed and performed. The course is divided into three sections.  In the first section, “diaspora and transnationalism,” we will examine how the two theoretical concepts may be illuminated through fiction, memoir, and autobiography.  The second section, “Reconstructing Identities,” provides students with a broad overview of Vietnamese nationalism in the 20th century and the subsequent dispersal of peoples after 1975.  The third section, “Public memory and Cultural Politics” considers how collective identities are represented.  Students will have the opportunity to learn about Vietnamese-American experiences in New Orleans and ongoing projects related to social justice and civic engagement.

3780 Language Death (3)

Language Death explores the linguistic diversity of the world.  World languages are identified and minority languages are localized.  Language structures that are unique to threatened languages are documented.  This course addresses the question of what is lost in terms of bodies of knowledge, world view, and identification of the limits of variability among human languages when languages die out.  The local and global causes of extinctions are explored, including genocide, natural disaster, dislocation and population absorption and language shift, or linguistic suicide.  Planning strategies at national and international levels are studied.  Such strategies have been found at times to foster monolingualism and at times to build bilingualism.  The success and consequences of different language planning strategies is explored from the perspective of heritage language users, nation-states, international corporations, non-governmental aid agencies, particularly those interested in development, and international organizations such as UNICEF and UNESCO.  Care is taken to show that languages that are threatened with extinction are no less “developed”, “modern”, “logical”, or “expressive” than the hegemonic leveling tongues.

Course objectives: (a) arrive at a definition of language endangerment and language death; (b) determine symptoms, both cultural and in terms of language structures, that are indicative of language shift and/or death;  (c) for a set of 30 sample languages determine the current degree of viability of these languages; (d)  for a given language determine which measures found to influence language sustainability and revitalization are in place within the speech community; (e)  become familiar with the laws, national and international, that govern language rights;  (f)  become familiar with sources of funding for endangered language research and with local initiatives;  (g) for a given speech community create a document that details the current state of the language, efforts being made to promote the use of the language, and areas of potential influence not currently employed.

3850 The Four Field Model (3)

Philosophical underpinnings of general anthropology. Epistemological ramifications of four anthropological fields (subdisciplines) as complete coverage of the subject matter. Contingency vs. rationale in the amalgamation of the four fields, as distinctive and definitive of the holistic study of Homo sapiens. Initial development of the model in the British Isles; institutionalization in 20th century North America. Connections to study of natives of the New World and salvage ethnography. Growth and specialization in subdisciplines. Debates over the logic and practicality in continuing cohesion of the model.

3860 Religions of Native North America (3)

As smaller scale, non-literate societies, the beliefs and practices of Native North American peoples illustrate many fundamental differences from the literate, universalistic religious traditions of the world. This course examines concepts needed for an understanding of Native American religions, widespread beliefs, regional variations, and the development of new religions in response to the dislocations caused by European contact.

 

3880 Writing Practicum (1)

Prerequisite: successful completion of the First-Year Writing Requirement. Corequisite: three-credit departmental course. Fulfills the college intensive- writing requirement.

3930 Languages of Louisiana (3)

4030 Kinship Systems (3)

For anthropology majors only. Description and analysis of patterns of marriage, descent, alliance, and kinship terminology as comprehended within the cross-cultural framework. The contribution of studies of kinship systems to the development of social anthropology.

 4060 Proseminar in Anthropology (3)

Prerequisite: junior or senior anthropology major status. Research and discussion on topics and problems involving integrated application of concepts and methods of the subdisciplines of anthropology.

4070 Urban Anthropology New Orleans (3)

 

4080 Race and Nation in the Spanish Caribbean (3)

 

4120 Conquest and Colonialism (3)

4130 North American Prehistory (3)

A survey of the archaeology of Canada and the United States from the appearance of man in the New World to the arrival of the Europeans. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

4150 African Prehistory (3)

Survey of African prehistory from the earliest tool-makers ( Olduvai Gorge , etc.) to protohistoric times. Emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara for later prehistory. Africa 's role in human origins, development and spread of food-producing economies, the African Iron Age, early contacts with Arabic and European peoples. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

4210 Seminar in Historical Ecology (3)

Historical ecology is a new interdisciplinary research program concerned with comprehending temporal and spatial dimensions in the relationships of human societies to local environments and the cumulative global effects of these relationships. Historical ecology contains core postulates that concern qualitative types of human-mediated disturbance of natural environments and the effect of these on species diversity, and environmental quality generally, among other parameters. A central term used in historical ecology to situate human behavior and agency in the environment is the landscape, as derived from historical geography, instead of the ecosystem, which is from systems ecology. We will focus closely on this distinction in class. We will explore the contribution that applied historical ecology can make to restoration of past landscapes.

4260 Archaeology of the U.S. Southwest (3)

This course will look at the development of prehistoric and early historic cultures of the U.S. Southwest. Both archaeological and early historical evidence of indigenous peoples and early explorers will be examined. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

4270 Roots of Western Civilization (3)

Cultural history of Southwestern Asia and Europe from the Mesolithic, through the development of food production, to the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis upon the beginnings of complex societies and urban life and their early, pre-Roman development in Europe . Fulfills Category A of curricular requirement

4410 Olmec and Maya Civilization (3)

Examines the development of highly advanced cultures and societies in one of the centers of native American civilization. Although the presentation stresses archaeological data, the course considers pre-Hispanic aesthetic achievements, social organization, values, written records, and adaptation to varying environments. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

4510 Species Concepts in Human Paleontology (3)

The number of proposed fossil hominid/hominin species has mushroomed in recent years yet the recognition of species in the human fossil record remains a daunting task. However, in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic (ancestor-descendent) relationships among humans, our ancestors, and close collateral relatives, we must group hominin fossils into meaningful taxonomic categories, ones that likely reflect truly monophyletic (shared common ancestor) descent patterns. This course explores different evolutionary species concepts and their applicability to human paleontology. Current approaches to the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships are then discussed, and the taxonomic status of hominin species is assessed.

4520 Diaspora Yoruba (3)

4560, 4570 Internship (3)

Prerequisite: approval of instructor. Internships in anthropology are available to qualified juniors and seniors on a limited basis for individual projects conducted in association with various private firms, public and private organizations, or government institutions in New Orleans . Students will work under professional supervision at these sites and consult with a faculty sponsor. Requirements include a written report on the experience and an evaluation by the supervisor. Credit for major elective requirement only.

4610 Ceramic Analysis (3)

A laboratory course dealing with the descriptive analysis of archaeological ceramics. Introduction to aspects of ceramic technology, classification, description, and the use of ceramics in archaeological research. Emphasis on practical methods and techniques for analyzing, describing, reporting, and graphically representing ceramic artifacts.

4620 Lithic Analysis (3)

A laboratory course dealing with the technological analysis of lithic artifacts. Introduction to fracture mechanics and flint-knapping, débitage analysis and classification. Application of principles and methods of technological classification, description, and graphical representation to archaeological specimens and modern replicates.

4880 Writing Practicum (1)

Prerequisite: successful completion of the First-Year Writing Requirement. Corequisite: three-credit departmental course. Fulfills the college intensive-writing requirement

H4910, H4920 Independent Studies (3)

Open to students in the Honors Program will approval of instructor.

4910, 4920 Independent Studies (1 or 3, 1 or 3)

By arrangement.

4930 Languages of Louisiana (3)

 

4950, 4960 Special Projects (3, 3)

By arrangement.

H4990-H5000 Honors Thesis (3, 4)

For senior honors candidates. Intensive reading and research in a selected field of anthropology.

6010 Anthropological Mathematics (3)

An introduction to mathematical methods relevant to anthropology.

6020 The Neandertal Enigma (3)

The Neandertals are the best understood group of non-modern fossil hominids, having been known to science since 1856. Yet even today they inspire many provocative questions. Who were the Neandertals? How different were they from us? Did they have language? How and why did they disappear? Were they our ancestors, or did our ancestors outcompete them? And if the Neandertals were not our ancestors, then who were? These are just some of the questions explored in this class on the classic "cavemen".

6060 South American Indians (3)

Ethnology of the indigenous peoples of lowland South America and adjacent southern Central America . The course examines cultural developments from prehistory to the present. Models for the classification of indigenous cultures, societies, and languages are critically reviewed. F ulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

6070 Contemporary Chinese Society (3)

The course focuses primarily on contemporary Chinese society as it exists in the People's Republic of China and provides some historical background from Imperial China. Special attention is given to exploring Chinese attitudes toward life goals and social mobility, gender formation and social behavior, law and dispute management strategies, and religious beliefs and the cult of the dead. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6080 East Asia (3)

Cultures and races of East Asia from Siberia to Indo-China. Special attention to Japan as a sub-area. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6100 South American Archaeology (3)

Survey of South American archaeology with primary focus on the Andean area. Overview of culture history from the Paleoindian period through the Spanish conquest.

6120 Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction (3)

Throughout this course we will examine current issues in human sexual behavior and reproduction (both biological and cultural) from an anthropological perspective. Most broadly defined, Anthropology is the study of human kind and through anthropological investigations we strive to learn who we are, how we came to be, and where we are headed. This approach will enable us to study the interrelatedness of biological, behavioral, cultural, social, and political aspects of human sex and reproduction. Through readings, lectures, films and class discussions we will examine issues such as new reproductive technologies, the biology and culture of pregnancy and childbirth, homosexuality, menopause, etc.

6130 Southeastern United States Prehistory (3)

Survey of the various problems of the archaeology of the Southeastern United States . Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6140 Primate Behavior and Biology (3)

This course will familiarize students with the order Primates, with an emphasis on the "rules" of and constraints on nonhuman primate social structure, and the diversity and flexibility of primate social behavior. An introduction to the nonhuman primates will include physical characteristics, ecological influences and constraints on behavior, evolutionary history, taxonomy, and a consideration of the genetic basis for an evolutionary interpretation of behavior. A more detailed examination of different types of behavior (e.g., aggressive, status-related, developmental) and their functions in primate social groups will be considered using evidence from both field and laboratory based studies. We will end with a review of the variability and flexibility of social structures, and a look to the future conservation of primate species. Students may not take both ANTH 314 and ANTH 614 for credit.

6150 Cognitive Anthropology (3)

Cross-cultural investigation of human thinking and rationality. Assesses linguistic relativity; cognitive rationalism; comparative aspects of human classification and nomenclature of diverse semantic fields; the use of linguistic and cultural universals in attempts to define the nature of human thought processes; possible relationships among sociocultural evolution and the size and structure of given vocabularies in unrelated languages; and the problem of irrationality. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6160 Peoples of the Pacific (3)

Introduction to the cultures of Polynesia , Micronesia , Melanesia, and Australia from the first settlement to the emergence of modern nation-states. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6180 Ethnic China (3)

6210 Development of Anthropological Theory (3)

Origin and development of anthropology since the Renaissance.

6212 Concepts of Ethnohistory (3)

6230 Archaeological Theory (3)

An introduction to theoretical basis of modern archaeology. The implications of theory for excavation, analysis, and interpretation.

6240 Technical Analyses for Archaeology (3)

A survey of scientific analytic techniques that have been adapted for application to common archaeological problems, site discovery, dating, site formation processes, artifact source and function, and subsistence and diet. Examination of methodological literature and case studies.

6250 Old World Paleolithic Prehistory (3)

A survey of man's cultural evolution from the earliest hominid toolmakers through the Upper Palaeolithic . Emphasis on the Old World . Man's Pleistocene environment and his adaptation to it, the record of technological change, the cultural context of human biological evolution. Fulfills Category A of curricular requirement

6260 Prehistory of Highland Mexico (3)

Patterns and processes of cultural developments in the highlands of central Mexico , western Mexico , and Oaxaca as known from archaeological and ethnohistorical data. Early cultures, Toltecs, Aztecs, Mixtecs, Zapotecs. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6270 Culture and Romantic Love (3)

6320 Social Structure (3)

History of the development of the structural/functional paradigm in social anthropology. Diachronic versus synchronic models, statistical versus normative models, decision models, networks, psychological reductionism.

6340 Medical Anthropology (3)

Survey of the relationships among disease, curing, culture and environment. Topics include problems of adapting modern medicines to diverse cultures; explication of the social and cultural correlates of physical and mental health and disease (social epidemiology); cross-cultural variation in disease concepts, medical practices, role of patients, and mental health; health and nutritional implications of planned culture change; contributions of anthropology to health-policy decisions of development organization. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

6350 Culture and Religion (3)

Religions, ideas, ritual, and organization of primitive peoples; nativistic and messianic movements; function of religion in social systems. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6395 Ethnography of Performance & Identity in N.O. and French LA (3)

6400 Culture and Language (3)

Language, the complex symbolic system of our species, has the power to index, refer to, frame and reframe social reality. Cultures, shared symbolic and interactional systems, both shape and are shaped by language and its use. This course will explore speech communities around the world, their social practices and the language schemata which ground them: the quotidian instance of "asking for a drink" in Indonesia , the ritual of trading insults in inner city Detroit , the routine of formal and phatic greetings among the Kuna.

6415 Pidgins and Creoles (3)

6420 Linguistic Field Methods (3)

Prerequisite: approval of instructor. Acquiring and using techniques for conducting linguistic field work. Investigation of one or more languages by working with native speakers. Emphasis on defining problems, developing and testing hypotheses.

6430 Archaeology of Cultural Landscapes (3)

Landscapes are an outcome of natural processes and cultural activity. Like archaeological sites, landscapes are palimpsests of the many forces of change that create them. Archaeologists of course do study ancient monuments and settlements, but they are also interested in the relationships between sites, patterns of movement between and through them, and the ways that past societies understood the landscapes in which they lived. This course explores the archaeology of landscapes, the effects of humans on ancient environments, and the social, and even sacred meanings of architecture, monuments and places in the past. Cross-listed as EVST (Environmental Studies) 343/643.


6480 Human Functional Morphology (3)

This course covers the functional anatomy of the human body, with emphasis on the structure, function, evolution, and development of the musculo-skeletal and nervous systems and associated human kinesiology. The principle of biological uniformitarianism is used to correlate hard tissue (i.e., teeth and bone) structure with soft tissue function, since soft tissues are only rarely recovered in archaeological or paleontological settings.

6490 Evolution of Behavior (3)

This seminar will be intensive investigation into the evolution of behavior. First, the original literature will be examined and then specific topics will be introduced, such as the evolution of social behavior, parental behavior, communication systems, and reproductive strategies, giving careful consideration to the interplay of the genetic system with the environmental constraints.

6500 Human Evolution (3)

Investigation into the evolution of modern Homo sapiens over the last 10 million years. Emphasis on the fossil record of human and nonhuman primates, the role of changing environments, and migration patterns. Models from 'technologically simple' cultures and modern nonhuman primates will be included in the consideration of developing social organizations.

6510 Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism (3)

Theoretical and ethnographic examinations of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Topics also include multiculturalism, globalization, and diasporas. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6520 Field Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3)

Theory, methods, and techniques of collecting, analyzing, and reporting ethnographic data including participant observation, formal and informal interviews, questionnaires, genealogies, componential analysis, photography, surveys and mapping, projective tests, ethnographic description, and anthropological fiction. Consideration of ethical problems and the use of oral and written historical materials. Field projects within the city.

6530 Native North American Art (3)

A survey of the great range of media and the many forms of aesthetic expression developed by the indigenous peoples of what today are the United States and Canada . The course examines the functions of art in smaller-scale societies and illustrates aspects of their dynamics. Changes in arts due to European contact, attempts at revivals of specific genres, and the emergence of named artists in the 20th century are also addressed. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

 

6540 Plains Indians (3)

Popularly considered the very image of Native America, 19th century Plains cultures were a recent and tragically short-lived florescence. The course examines indigenous life on the Plains before the arrival of horses, the migrations of peoples with diverse origins on to the Plains, and the transformation of their life-ways through the introduction of horses and European trade goods. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

6700 Spoken Nahuatl (3)

The essentials of Nahuatl phonology, morphology, and syntax. Conversational practice and laboratory sessions along with emphasis on linguistic analysis of the language. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6710 Historical Ecology of Amazonia (3)

Interactions between local peoples and Amazonian landscapes from prehistory to the present. Amazonian landscapes as an analytic unit will be examined from the interdisciplinary perspective of historical ecology. Changes and development of forests and savannas since the arrival of human beings. Historical, ecological, cultural forces involved in biological and edaphic diversity in modern forests. Long-term effects of prehistoric and historic human occupations and manipulation of landscapes. Implications for conservation and development. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

6720 Spoken Yoruba (3)

This course provides an introduction to Yoruba language. Emphasis is laid on grammar and vocabulary development, listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Practice in oral discussion will be enhanced by weekly dramatical presentations, poetry recitals, and story-telling. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6745 Advanced Mummy Studies (3)

 

6800 Spoken Yucatecan Maya (3)

The essentials of Yucatecan Maya phonology, morphology, and syntax. Oral/aural exercises and conversational practice with a native speaker. Introduction to colonial manuscripts. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6810 Introduction to Maya Hieroglyphs (3)

A survey of present knowledge about the nature of the pre-Columbian Maya writing system, including calendrical notation, astronomical calculations, the structure and content of phoneticism, and its relationship to other Mesoamerican writing systems. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6820 Classical Yucatecan Maya (3)

Morphology and syntax of Classical Yucatecan Maya. Palaeography and translation of Colonial Maya documents representing the following genres: land surveys and transfers, wills, official complaints, divinatory and/or prophetic texts. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6830 Aztec and Maya Literature (3)

A survey of indigenous literatures of Mesoamerica focusing on Aztec, Quiche, Tzotzil, and Yucatecan Maya sources and covering myths, chronicles, poetry, songs, folktales, proverbs, prayers, incantations, and riddles. Topics include elements of style, relationship between narrative and pictures, principles of translation, Aztec and Maya views of the Spanish Conquest, and European influences on the content and style of Mesoamerican literature. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6840 Beginning Kaqchikel (Maya) Language (3)

Kaqchikel is one of the four largest Mayan groups in Guatemala , having over a million self-identified members, about half of whom speak their mother tongue. Taught in three Kaqchikel communities in Guatemala , this six-week course enables students to achieve conversational fluency and elementary reading/writing skills. Fulfills Category B of curricular requirement

6870 Kaqchikel Maya Culture (3)

Contemporary culture practices of the Kaqchikel in four communities of Guatemala will be examined as exemplary of the processes of cultural revitalization, integration into national and local political arenas, participation in world markets, and interaction with world religion. Culture practitioners will participate in the course as facilitators and guest speakers. Corequisite: Beginning Kaqchikel (Maya) Language or equivalent. Fulfills Categories B and C of curricular requirement

6880 Writing Practicum (1)

Varies; section number and explanation available when offered. Fulfills writing requirement

6920 Archaeology of Cultural Landscapes (3)

7030 Kinship Systems (3)

Description and analysis of patterns of marriage, descent, alliance, and kinship terminology as comprehended within a cross-cultural framework. The contribution of studies of kinship systems to the development of social anthropology.

7040 History of Anthropological Theory (3)

no description in catalogue

7050 Ethnographic Research Design (3)

Involves the central plan and conceptual framework for the construction and analysis of primary data collected during fieldwork. This course seeks to demystify fieldwork by specifying initial assumptions and hypotheses and by selecting relevant methodological tools in an ethnographic research project. The course covers operationalism, model building, measurement, sampling, research modes, hypothesis testing, construction and interpretation of folk models, and preparation of research proposals.

7070 Urban Anthropology of New Orleans (3)

7080 East Asia (3)

 

7090 Analysis of Selected Cultural Systems (3)

Content varies; specific description provided when offered.

For Spring 2008: ANTH 709-01 is Anthropology of Money.

                         ANTH 709-02 is Archaeology of Art.

                         ANTH 709-03 is Archaeology of Culture, Contact.

                         ANTH 709-04 is Language Death.

                         ANTH 709-05 is Diaspora Yoruba.

                         ANTH 709-06 is Comm in Archaeology, Ethnohistory.

For Fall 2007:     ANTH 709-02 is Many Faces of Islam.

                         ANTH 709-03 is Anthropology of Cities.

                         ANTH 709-04 is Contemporary Vietnamese Society.

                         ANTH 709-05 is History of Human Technology.

                         ANTH 709-06 is Family and Gender in East Asia.

                         ANTH 709-07 is Pol Econ: Ancient Colo LA.

For Spring 2007: ANTH 709-01 is Theories of Modernity.

                         ANTH 709-02 is African Modenities.

For Fall 2006:     ANTH 709-01 is Theories of Identity.

                         ANTH 709-02 is Contemporary Issues in SE Asia.

                         ANTH 709-04 is LA PreColumbian Cultures.

For Spring 2006:  ANTH 709-01 is Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction.

                         ANTH 709-02 is Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction.

                         ANTH 709-03 is Archaeology of Gender.

                         ANTH 709-04 is Primate Models Human Evolution.

                         ANTH 709-05 is Ethnic Society Movement in Latin America.

                         ANTH 709-06 is Urban Anthropology.

                         ANTH 709-07 is Seminar in Historical Ecology.

For Spring 2005:  ANTH 709-01 is Afro-Brazilian Identity.

                          ANTH 709-02 is Anthropology of Sex & Reproduction.

For Fall 2004:      ANTH 709-01 is Anthropology of Religion.

For Spring 2004: ANTH 709-02 is Many Faces of Islam.

For Spring 2003: ANTH 709-02 is African Modernities.

For Fall 2002: ANTH 709-01 is Mayan Linguistics Seminar.

For Fall 2002: ANTH 709-02 is African Modernities . Offered in conjunction with ANTH-309-02.

For Spring 2002: ANTH 709-03 is Language Maintenance & Shift. Offered in conjunction with ANTH-309-03.

For Spring 2002: ANTH 709-05 is Comparative Cosmologies. Offered in conjunction with ANTH-309-05.

For Fall 2000: ANTH 709-03 is Macrosociolinguistics . Offered in conjunction with ANTH-309-03. The interaction of language and society is the focus of this course. Macrosociolingusitics takes society as the starting point for examining this relationship. Topics covered include multilingualism, attitudes toward language, language maintenance and shift, and how language plays a role in development planning.

For Spring 1997: ANTH 709-3 is Ethnographic Research Design . Involves the central plan and conceptual framework for the construction and analysis of primary data collected during fieldwork. This course seeks to demystify fieldwork by specifying initial assumptions and hypotheses, and by selecting relevant methodological tools in an ethnographic research project. The course covers operationalism, model-building, measurement, sampling, research modes, hypothesis-testing, construction and interpretation of folk models, and preparation of research proposals.

7100 Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (3)

Multivariate statistics and other mathematical methods relevant to the analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. Applications include artifact analysis and numerical taxonomy, inter-assemblage comparison, and spatial analysis.

7110 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-311. A survey of the cultures of sub-Saharan Africa from the time of European contact to the present. A detailed study of selected African cultures, identifying and explaining cultural diversity and unity of African cultures, and comparing African cultures with cultures of other geographic areas. Inequality, development, the family, gender roles, kinship systems, and world view are considered.

7120 Conquest and Colonialism (3)

Content varies; specific description provided when offered.

7130 Prehistory of North America (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-413. A survey of the archaeology of Canada and the United States from the appearance of man in the New World to the arrival of the Europeans.

7140 Primate Biology and Behavior (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-314. Survey of field and laboratory investigations of the biology and behavior of the living non-human primates.

7150 Prehistory of Africa (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-415. Survey of African prehistory from the earliest tool-makers ( Olduvai Gorge , etc.) to protohistoric times. Emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara for later prehistory. Africa 's role in human origins, development and spread of food-producing economies, the African Iron Age, early contacts with Arabic and European peoples.

7160 Physical Anthropology (3)

Offered irregularly; description provided when offered.

7170 Seminar in Archaeology (3)

Offered irregularly; description provided when offered.

For Spring 2000: The seminar will focus upon the Epiclassic or Terminal Classic period in Mesoamerica that is generally dated to the eighth through tenth centuries A.D. Traditionally characterized as a period of balkanization following the demise of the Teotihuacan and Classic Maya supraregional polities, it is increasingly evident that Epiclassic Mesoamerica has a number of unifying events, themes and processes and in many respects can be viewed as a "horizon" in its own right. Moreover, recent chronometric and other evidence now places many key events of the Postclassic period in the Epiclassic period instead, while moving Classic/Epiclassic boundary back in time. The seminar will consider this and other evidence from a number of regions of Mesoamerica at both the local and regional levels in attempting to interpret the events and processes of the Epiclassic from a pan-regional perspective.

For Fall 1999: Seminar in archaeological research design

For Fall 1997: Seminar in archaeological research design.

7180 Advanced Middle American Archaeology (3)

Content varies; specific description provided when offered.

For Fall 1996: The Archaeology of Copán , Honduras , from a Comparative Perspective. An investigation of what has been learned at Copán, one of the most thoroughly studied of all Classic Maya sites. Identification and detailed consideration of anthropological and culture-historical problems that currently occupy the attention of archaeologists now working there.

7190 Economic Anthropology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-319. The study of economic behavior in band, tribal, and peasant societies. Emphasis on the impact of culture and environment on economic decision-making in the Third World . Competing theoretical approaches, particularly evolutionary, ecological, substantivist, and Marxist, are critically reviewed.

7200 Socio-Cultural Theory (3)

Offered irregularly; description provided when offered.

7210 Concepts of Ethnohistory (3)

An introduction to the uses and misuses of the documentary record in anthropology. A consideration of the history of documentary studies in anthropology and the basic principles of documentary research. Critical survey, through selected case studies, of the range of document types and their potential uses.

 7250 Selected Research Topic (3)

Offered irregularly; title and description provided when offered.

For Fall 1998: ANTH-725-01, Mesoamerican Divinatory Codices, is offered in conjunction with ARHS-683-01. A comparison of Central Mexican and Maya codices.

7260 Prehistory U.S. Southwest

This course will look at the development of prehistoric and early historic cultures of the U.S. Southwest. Both archaeological and early historical evidence of indigenous peoples and early explorers will be examined.

7270 Later Prehistory of Europe and the Near East (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-427. Cultural history of Southwestern Asia and Europe from the Mesolithic, through the development of food production, to the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis upon the beginnings of complex societies and urban life and their early, pre-Roman development in Europe .

7280 Middle American Indians (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-328.

This course covers the indigenous cultures of Mexico and Guatemala from just before the Spanish conquest down to the present. Major topics include the mighty Aztec civilization, the consequences of the Spanish conquest and colonial rule, the endurance of distinctive indigenous cultures into modern times, the impact of development programs and globalization, and current indigenous movements in the region.

7290 Linguistic Analysis (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-329. Language as a reflection of the human mind and the role of language in defining the essence of humanity. Language and the expression of social values. Emphasis on analysis of primary linguistic data. Critical examination of theories of linguistic structure.

7300 History of Writing (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-330. This course will look at the different systems of writing which have been used in various cultures through time with attention to the materials and purpose in relation to the cultures. Orientation to and practice in decipherment will be included. Finally, the issues of modern script development will be introduced.

7310 Prehistory of Languages (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-331. The investigation of language change and its causes. The reconstruction of earlier linguistic forms. The Indo-European language family. Selected problems in phonological and grammatical reconstruction.

7320 Archaeology of Gender (3)

The study of gender roles, gender relations, and gender ideologies in past societies.

 7330 Anthropology of Gender (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-333. A theoretical and ethnographical examination of how gender is constructed across cultures. Topics include sex and gender, gender identity, bodily experiences, masculinity and femininity, gender roles, kinship and gender, gender stratification, and gender equality, as well as gender, ethnicity, and class.

7340 Dialectology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-344. Introduction to language variation both geographically and socially. The course looks at the history and methods of dialectology as well as the ways speakers demonstrate identity through speech patterns.

7360 Anthropology of Cities (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-336. This course focuses on anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. Topics include the cultural meanings of public space and the built environment, processes of social differentiation and class formation, the role of capital, and the emergence of social movements. The second half of the course is organized around a comparison of four ethnographic case-studies of cities outside the United States and Europe. Throughout the semester, studies will also discuss how anthropological approaches may be applied to New Orleans.

7370 Locating Southeast Asia (3)

This course examines contemporary Southeast Asia.  As one of the most diverse regions in the world, the region confounds easy characterization. The first part of the course provides students with a broad overview of the social, cultural, and political institutions of the region with a focus on Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam.  The second part turns to contemporary issues including political and economic development, religious change, and cultural constructions of identity.  Readings include academic essays, short stories, and full-length ethnographies.

7380 Cultural Dynamics (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-338. An exploration of the development in the western tradition of ideas concerning culture, its variation, and change. The course focuses on the specific insights of anthropology with regard to the study of change processes such as innovation, directed culture change, nativism, and revitalization. The relevant contributions of other social sciences will also be considered.

7390 Peasants in Preindustrial Society (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-339. An exploration of the concept of peasants as a distinct socio-cultural type. To this end, the relevant literature from anthropology, history, economics, political science, and other disciplines is reviewed and illustrated through selected case studies. Consideration is given also to relationships between peasants and the wider society, early modern transformations, and the problems associated with modernization.

7400 Language and Culture (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-340. Language, the complex symbolic system of our species, has the power to index, refer to, frame and reframe social reality. Cultures, shared symbolic and interactional systems, both shape and are shaped by language and its use. This course will explore speech communities around the world, their social practices and the language schemata which ground them: the quotidian instance of "asking for a drink" in Indonesia , the ritual of trading insults in inner city Detroit , the routine of formal and phatic greetings among the Kuna.

7410 Prehistory of Eastern Mesoamerica (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-441. Examines the development of highly advanced cultures and societies in one of the centers of native American civilization. Although the presentation stresses archaeological data, the course considers pre-Hispanic aesthetic achievements, social organization, values, written records, and adaptation to varying environments.

7430 Problems in Old World Prehistory (3)

Offered irregularly; description provided when offered.

7441 Lexicography: Dictionaries (3)

7450 Observational Methods (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-345. This course will focus on the development, design, analysis, and presentation of research on behavior using observational methods. While these methods can be used on captive populations (zoo, research center), they are appropriate also for studies of free-ranging animals, including human beings. The student will be exposed to the specific challenges of observational research and will learn appropriate levels of analysis.

7470 Many Faces of Islam (3)

7490 Problems in North American Prehistory (3)

Offered irregularly; description provided when offered.

7510 Fossil Hominin Taxonomy (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-451. The number of proposed fossil hominid/hominin species has mushroomed in recent years yet the recognition of species in the human fossil record remains a daunting task. However, in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic (ancestor-descendent) relationships among humans, our ancestors, and close collateral relatives, we must group hominin fossils into meaningful taxonomic categories, ones that likely reflect truly monophyletic (shared common ancestor) descent patterns. This course explores different evolutionary species concepts and their applicability to human paleontology. Current approaches to the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships are then discussed, and the taxonomic status of hominin species is assessed.

7535 Native American Language and Linguistics (3)

 

7560 Environmental Archaeology (3)

7570 Intermediate Kaqchikel (Maya) Language (3)

Students in the intermediate course will have some group class activities, with materials presented in the dramatization to individual discussion progression. In addition, these students, who have achieved a level of conversational competency, will deepen their understanding of the language, working with individual language facilitators in daily conversation programs and in non-structured interactions within the Kaqchikel communities. Literacy is encouraged through regular reading assignments and associated essays.

7580 Advanced Kaqchikel Language (3)

Advanced students of Kaqchikel are assigned Kaqchikel research partners and work within the communities to strengthen their spoken language competence. Modern technical documents relating to agriculture, health care, cultural revitalization and political activism are read. Students regularly compose Kaqchikel essays based on these readings. Colonial Kaqchikel documents and the colonial orthography are introduced. (Prereq: Intermediate Kaqchikel or equivalent).

7590 Syntactic Theory (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-359. Introduction of transformational generative syntax, with examples from selected areas of English grammar. Formal models in grammatical description. Emphasis on the logic of linguistic argumentation.

7600 Pre-Columbian Art (3)

»»»»»»No description in catalogue.

7610 Ceramic Analysis (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-461. A laboratory course dealing with the descriptive analysis of archaeological ceramics. Introduction to aspects of ceramic technology, classification, description, and the use of ceramics in archaeological research. Emphasis on practical methods and techniques for analyzing, describing, reporting, and graphically representing ceramic artifacts.

7620 Lithic Analysis (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-462. A laboratory course dealing with the technological analysis of lithic artifacts. Introduction to fracture mechanics and flint-knapping, débitage analysis and classification. Application of principles and methods of technological classification, description, and graphical representation to archaeological specimens and modern replicates.

7630 Linguistic Phonetics (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-363. An overview of articulatory and acoustic phonetics with emphasis on matching acoustic clues closely with the articulatory gestures. The first part of the course will study the articulatory and acoustic cues to the range of English and non-English speech sounds with information about the normal range of variation. The second part will focus on collecting and interpreting acoustic data and on using such data as evidence to solve phonological problems in normal and pathological speech.

7640 Phonology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-364. Introduction to phonological analysis and theory, with strong emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages. Major issues to be addressed include universal principles of human phonological systems, language-specific variation, constraints on representation of rules, the relationship of phonology to morphological and syntactic components of the grammar, and the historical underpinnings of current theoretical models.

7650 Morphology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-365. Introduction to prosodic and non-prosodic morphology with emphasis on data analysis and argumentation. With data from a variety of languages, the first part of the course will examine non-prosodic morphological processes to highlight the typology of word structure across languages. The second part will examine morphological processes conditioned by prosody and consider the various frameworks for analyzing the data; eventually the course will work toward a formal model. The main objectives of the course are: 1) to learn to analyze morphological data; 2) to learn to compare alternative analyses for a given set of data and to find evidence to choose between the alternatives; and 3) to learn to present linguistic analysis and argumentation in a coherent essay.

7660 Discourse Analysis (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-366. Study of written and spoken texts from a variety of languages and language-use contexts. Focus on structural aspects of language (noun phrase construction and anaphora, topicalization, focus constructions, word order, deictics and definite reference) as they relate to the situated use of language.

7670 Language and its Acquisition (3)

Usually taught in conjunction with ANTH-367. Introduction to issues such as language and its relation to animal communication, the genetic basis of language ability and acquisition, neurological aspects of linguistic knowledge, and first language acquisition. Emphasis on data collection, description, and analysis.

7680 Language and Power (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-368. Exploration of the ways that language indexes, reflects, and constructs power. Cross-cultural study of the interrelationship of social ascriptions, attitudes toward groups and their members, and the speech patterns of in-group/out-group members. Examination of the manipulation of power and its linguistic correlates in the domains of medicine, the media, education, and the law. Effects of language policy, especially officialization and standardization, on speakers of minority languages or codes.

7690 Language and Gender (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-369. Exploration of the interrelation of structures of formal linguistic analysis with the construction of gender identities cross-culturally.

7700 Ecological Anthropology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-370. Critically reviews case studies of ecosystemic and energetic relations between human populations, cultures, and the environment in diverse ethnographic settings of the world, such as Amazonia, the Great Basin, New Guinea , and Southeast Asia . Examines the historical emergence of ecological paradigms in anthropology. Compares the modern contributions of cultural ecology, evolutionary ecology, ethnoecology, and historical ecology. Evaluates potential contributions of ecological anthropology to general ecology.

7720 Bioanthropology of Modern Humans (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-372. Biological adaptations of living human populations to their environments, and the interaction of these adaptations with cultural patterns. Relationships of body size, form, and composition to climatic and nutritional factors in various geographical groups of modern man. Major adaptive problems facing the human species are discussed and implications for the future explored.

7730 Forensic Anthropology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-373. Introduction to forensic anthropology, a subdiscipline of physical anthropology concerned with the identification of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Surveys the history of the field and the techniques used to determine age, sex, and physical characteristics of an individual from skeletonized remains, as well as methods used for positive identification, estimating time since death, and determining cause and manner of death.

7740 Sociobiology of Humans (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-374. Investigation of human social behavior from an evolutionary perspective, including the interplay among culture, environment, and natural selection. The original literature will be covered, as well as the evolutionary ecology of human social behavior. A critical analysis of studies done utilizing evolutionary interpretations of human social behavior will be the topic of discussion, including recommendations on improvements of this line of investigation.

7750 Human Paleopathology (3)

Usually offered in conjunction with ANTH-375. Survey of the field of paleopathology, the study of health and disease in ancient populations. Topics include: methods for identifying evidence of injury and disease in bones, teeth, and mummified tissue; ancient medicine and surgery; chemical approaches to reconstructing diet; and human health trends through time.

7760 Primate Evolution & Adaptation (3)

7780 Language Death (3)

Language Death explores the linguistic diversity of the world.  World languages are identified and minority languages are localized.  Language structures that are unique to threatened languages are documented.  This course addresses the question of what is lost in terms of bodies of knowledge, world view, and identification of the limits of variability among human languages when languages die out.  The local and global causes of extinctions are explored, including genocide, natural disaster, dislocation and population absorption and language shift, or linguistic suicide.  Planning strategies at national and international levels are studied.  Such strategies have been found at times to foster monolingualism and at times to build bilingualism.  The success and consequences of different language planning strategies is explored from the perspective of heritage language users, nation-states, international corporations, non-governmental aid agencies, particularly those interested in development, and international organizations such as UNICEF and UNESCO.  Care is taken to show that languages that are threatened with extinction are no less “developed”, “modern”, “logical”, or “expressive” than the hegemonic leveling tongues.

Course objectives: (a) arrive at a definition of language endangerment and language death; (b) determine symptoms, both cultural and in terms of language structures, that are indicative of language shift and/or death;  (c) for a set of 30 sample languages determine the current degree of viability of these languages; (d)  for a given language determine which measures found to influence language sustainability and revitalization are in place within the speech community; (e)  become familiar with the laws, national and international, that govern language rights;  (f)  become familiar with sources of funding for endangered language research and with local initiatives;  (g) for a given speech community create a document that details the current state of the language, efforts being made to promote the use of the language, and areas of potential influence not currently employed.

7850 The Four Field Model(3)

Philosophical underpinnings of general anthropology. Epistemological ramifications of four anthropological fields (subdisciplines) as complete coverage of the subject matter. Contingency vs. rationale in the amalgamation of the four fields, as distinctive and definitive of the holistic study of Homo sapiens. Initial development of the model in the British Isles; institutionalization in 20th century North America. Connections to study of natives of the New World and salvage ethnography. Growth and specialization in subdisciplines. Debates over the logic and practicality in continuing cohesion of the model.

7860 Religions of Native North America (3)

7910 Seminar in Mexican Manuscript Painting (3)

7930 Languages of Louisiana (3)

7950 Special Projects (3)

7960 Special Projects (3)

9980 Master's Research

9990 Dissertation Research

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